PsychoanalysisToday.com

Research

The following is a list of general research conducted on psychodynamic psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and psychosomatics:

Empirical Studies

The research information listed below was compiled by Alex Behn and Valery Hazanov, graduate students within the Clinical Psychology Program of Teachers College, Columbia University.

The following are empirical studies supporting psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression:

  • Cuijpers, P., Van Straten, A., Andersson, G., & Van Oppen, P. (2008). Psychotherapy for depression in adults: A meta-analysis of comparative outcome studies. Journal of Counsulting and Clinical Psychology, 76, 909-922. (7 meta-analyses comparing 7 major types of treatment for mild to moderate depression, all of them with at lest 5 randomized comparative trials: CBT, nondirective supportive, BA, PT, problem solving, IPT, social skills training).
  • Driessen, E., Ciujpers, P., de Maat, S.C., Abbass, A.A., de Jonghe, F., Dekker, J.J. (2010) The efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression: a meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review. Vol.30(1), Feb 2010, 25-36. (This is a meta-analysis including studies that compared PT to control conditions at posttreatment, pretreatment to posttreatment, and PT to other therapies).
  • Leichsenring, F. (2011). Comparative effects of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy in depression: A meta-analytic approach. Clinical Psychology Review, 21, 401-419. (This is a meta-analysis of studies that compared PT with CBT/BT therapy, focusing on depressive symptoms, general psychiatric symptomatology and social functioning).

The following are empirical studies supporting psychodynamic psychotherapy for personality disorders:

  • Leichsenring, F. & Leibing, E. (2003). The effectiveness of psychodynamic therapy and cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of personality disorders: A meta-analysis. American Journal of Psychiatry, 160, 1223-1232. (This is a meta-analysis for effectiveness of PT for various disorders. Focus on pre and postreatment differences (within group)).
  • Messer, S.B., & Abbass, A.A. (in press). Evidence-based psychodynamic therapy with personality disorders. In J. Magnavita (ed.). Evidence based treatment of personality dysfunction: Principles, methods and processes. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. (This is a meta-analysis for effectiveness of PT for Personality Disorders. Focus on general symptom improvement.)

The following are empirical studies supporting psychodynamic psychotherapy for somatic disorders:

  • Abbass, A., Kisely, S., & Kroenke, K. (2009). Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for somatic disorders: Systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 78, 265-274. (This is a meta-analysis for effectiveness of PT for somatic disorders. Focus on improvement in general psychiatric symptoms).
  • Anderson, E.M., & Lambert, M.J. (1995). Short-term dynamically oriented psychotherapy: A review and meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 15, 503-514. (This is a meta-analysis for effectiveness of PT for various disorders. Focus on various outcomes).
  • de Maat, S., de Jonghe, F., Schoevers, R., & Dekker, J. (2009). The effectiveness of long-term psychoanalytic therapy: A systematic review of empirical studies. Harvard Review of Psychiatry, 17, 1-23. (This is a meta-analysis of studies that compare pre to posttreatment scores in long-term psychoanalytic therapy).
  • Leichsenring, F., Rabung, S., & Leibing, E. (2004). The efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy in specific psychiatric disorders: A meta-analysis. Archives of General Psychiatiry, 61, 1208-1216. (This is a meta-analysis for effectiveness of PT for various disorders. Focus on change in target problems).
  • Leichsenring, F., & Rabung, S. (2008). Effectiveness of long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy: A meta-anlysis. Journal of the American Medical Association, 300, 1551-1565. (This is a meta-analysis of studies that compare long-term vs. short-term PT for multiple, overlapping disorders. Focuses on overall outcome).